Frequently Asked Questions

F.A.Q.

HOME HEALTH FAQ

What is Home Health Care?

Home care is a health care option offering a broad range of medical care and support services provided in the home. Services range from simple assistance in the activities of daily living to high-tech medical procedures. Home care is a cost-effective alternative to hospital and nursing home stays.  All County Home Care and Hospice provides a full range of health and supportive services through hospice and bereavement counseling. All County Home Care and Hospice provides skilled health care and supportive services, utilizing nurses, therapists (physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, medical social workers, home health aides, and often other services, pharmacy and volunteer support.

When is Home Health Care Appropriate?

People with a new diagnosis or illness, coping with a chronic problem, or those recovering from surgery or hospitalization. All County Home Care and Hospice will provide the specialized services you need.

What can I expect on the first home health care visit?

On the first visit, a nurse or therapist will conduct an initial evaluation. At All County Home Care and Hospice this thorough interview and evaluation is part of our coordinated approach to managing your overall health status. Our evaluation focuses on educating you in self-care management and partners with your doctor to promote disease prevention and proactive care – which includes the family or caregivers.

This team approach facilitates an easier transition for you from a hospital or nursing facility to your home, and actively engages you and your caregivers in your health care.

Will All County Home Care create a care plan just for me or my loved one?

Yes. After your doctor refers you to All County Home Care, an All County Home Care clinician will come to your home to assess your needs. We will communicate with your doctor to discuss the assessment and work together to develop your personal plan of care. All County Home Care staff will implement your physician-ordered plan of care and keep your doctor updated about your progress. If your condition or needs change, we’ll collaborate with your doctor to review your plan of care and make any adjustments deemed necessary.

What does “homebound status” mean?

Essentially, your condition should be such that there exists a “normal inability to leave home” and doing so would require considerable and taxing effort. Generally speaking, you would be considered homebound if you have a condition due to an illness or injury that restricts your ability to leave home without the aid of an assistive device (such as crutches, canes, walkers or wheelchairs), without the assistance of another person, or if leaving the home is medically inadvisable.

You can leave the home as often as you need for medical treatment that cannot be provided in the home. Further, you are allowed brief and infrequent absences from the home for some non-medical reasons, such as an occasional trip to the barber/beauty shop, to attend church, or for unique family events (like a graduation).

HOSPICE FAQ

When should a decision about entering a hospice program be made and who should make it?

At any time during a life-limiting illness, it’s appropriate to discuss all of a patient’s care options, including hospice. By law the decision belongs to the patient. Most hospices accept patients who have a life-expectancy of six months or less and who are referred by their personal physician. 

What specific assistance does hospice provide home-based patients?

Hospice patients are cared for by a team consisting of a physician, a nurse, social workers, counselors, home health aides, clergy, therapists, and volunteers. Each one provides assistance based on his or her own area of expertise. In addition, hospices provide medications, supplies, equipment, and other services related to the terminal illness.

What is hospice's success rate in battling pain?

Very high. Using some combination of medications, counseling and therapies, most patients can attain a level of comfort they consider acceptable.

Does hospice provide care 24 hours a day, 7 days a week?

Hospice staff is on call for emergencies 24 hours a day. Hospice care does not include a nurse in the home 24/7. If you require more care than can be provided in the home, some hospices have their own inpatient facilities. Most communities have nursing homes, inpatient residential centers and hospitals with hospice care options.

Does hospice provide any help to the family after the patient dies?

Most hospices provide continuing contact and support for caregivers for at least a year following the death of a loved one. Many hospices also sponsor bereavement groups and support for anyone in the community who has experienced a death of a family member, a friend, or similar losses.